Saturday, February 23, 2013

How to Make Stained Glass Mosaic Windows


This post is by special request.

How to make stained glass mosaic windows.

I first saw the technique on HGTV about eight years ago.   Since then, I've made
a total of 48 windows -- this one is my latest. I finished it in about three days.

Here's how.

I start by picking out a vintage window.    And yes.   I've collected a lot of windows
from salvage companies and resale shops.   This is the stash in my garage.




I'm always on the look out for interesting one pane windows -- all sizes.    I like a
shabby, vintage finish.   They have more character.

I just have to make sure the glass is secure and solid.

In many cases, I'll recaulk my windows for better stability.   Use a scraping tool or putty
knife to remove any loose caulk on the back of your window.   Pick up a clear window
caulk from your hardware store and apply a fresh bead of caulk around the back of
your window where the glass and the frame meets.     After the new caulk dries
completely, you're ready to clean your window.

Knock off or scrape off any loose paint.   Use a scrub brush and dish detergent to
remove any dirt or residue.   Let your window then dry completely.



Here's the window I selected for my latest mosaic.


My work space is my kitchen table.  (Maybe one day I'll have my own studio.)
For now, it's a good place to work - by a large bay window -- which is essential in
working on glass -- lots of good lighting.

So.   Got my window.

Next.   Decide on a design.

I get inspiration for my mosaics from lots of different places -- paintings, graphics, even
pillows and coffee mugs.

This is the painting by Shelli Walters that served as an inspiration for this window:

Original Art by Shelli Walters


Next.    I turn the window over to the backside.    That's where I'll draw out my design
using a dry erase marker.


And yes, I draw it free handed.    If I have to make an adjustment (and that happens
a lot) I just wipe off the dry erase marker and begin again.   When I finish drawing it out,
I sit the window up and make sure I'm happy with the finished design.

Again.   This is the back side of the window.     I sometimes write in a letter to identify
the color I plan to use in the design.  W = white.    P = purple.   You get the idea.

I've recently started putting some white paper on the front side of the window to help me
see my design my clearly as I'm drawing it out.  

Now that my design is drawn, it's time to select the glass.

This is my favorite part.   I love to pick out colors that will work well together and have
the brightest impact.

I've got a stash of stained glass as well.    And a healthy respect for handling it.    So far,
I've never received a bad cut during the completion of 48 windows, put I'm always
careful.


I buy much of my glass at Hobby Lobby -- when it's on sale.    One sheet may run between
$5-$9.00.    For more unique colors, I visit the LEB Studio off Wade Hampton Blvd in
Greenville.   They have a ton of glass in lots of beautiful colors.

So, here's the colors I pulled for this window.


And these are the essential tools I use in cutting and breaking the glass.


These are the only tools I use in making my windows.

If I start with a full sheet of glass, I use the clear plastic tool - a glass cutter (right)
to score  the glass.    Working in a straight line, I run the glass cutter from one end
of the glass to the other to create a very light "score line."  Using the yellow handle
tool (the glass breaking pliers) directly on the score line, the glass breaks in a clean line.
The white bottle is glass cutter oil (need to keep the glass cutter well oiled so it cuts
effectively.)

Then I can break the clean line of stained glass into the "triangle mosaic shapes) by using
the black tool - the mosaic cutter.    All of these tools can be purchased online or at
Hobby Lobby.

If you look closely, you can see that the triangle mosaic shapes fit easily together
to fill the design area.   I leave a slight space between each piece and make additional
cuts if I need a special fit.


It may look complicated, but it's not.   I apply an area of glue to the window (such as the
single flower and lay the glass directly on top of the glue area.)  It's like putting together a
puzzle.   The more you do it, the easier and faster it becomes.

You can find the clear silicone glue at Lowes or Walmart.



Now, my window is face up.   From this point on, I'm working on the front side of the
window.  (Remember, my design is drawn onto the backside of the window with a
dry erase marker.   I moved the white paper to the backside of the glass now -- which
makes it easier for me to see my design.  I'm gluing the stained glass pieces to the front
side of the window - following the pattern I've created with my dry erase marker.


I mentioned it's my sunniest window.    It usually attracts one of my cats.   Gus came
by for a visit while I was working.

This is what the window looks like when I've finished laying the glass on the design.
At this point, I haven't grouted the mosaic - so there's light coming through each piece.

I use a canister of compressed air to blow off the design to make sure it's free of dust
(or cat hair) or any debris before grouting.



To grout the mosaic, I buy a bag of sanded grout from Lowes.   The grout mix comes in
a range of colors.   For this piece, I'm using a grout color called "straw."   I follow the
instructions on the bag of sanded grout and mix it in my kitchen sink with a hand mixer.
(And yes, it's a mixer I've designated for mosaics -- and not for baking!)

When I mix the grout, it will have the consistency of "cake batter."

I pour it directly on my mosaic.




I wear disposable gloves during this part -- and spread the grout over the entire mosaic.

Again, following the grout instructions on the bag, it sits for about 30 minutes -- and
then I scrape off the excess grout with a spatula and a sponge.


The grout adheres to the areas "around" each mosaic piece -- creating the mosaic look.

The next step is the most tedious.   After I've removed all of the excess grout with a
sponge, I put the mosaic up in a window to check and make sure the grout has adhered
to all of the hundreds of cracks in the mosaic.   If I'm lucky, there's not a lot of patching or
reapplying that has to be done at this point.

These are the sophisticated tools I use for this stage.


The excess grout takes on more of a clay texture once it's been exposed to the air --
so I keep a little on hand to do any repair work -- and use the straight pin or push pin to
clear out any  excess glue around the mosaics that keeps the grout from adhering.

Thankfully, with this piece -- the clean up stage didn't take long.


After the grout dries overnight, I'll wipe it clean a final time and add the hardware to hang
the mosaic.  I'll screw in a couple of hooks at the top of the window and  add a small
chain to hang it in a window or on a porch.

A final personal touch for me is to hand write a verse of scripture on the back of the
window frame -- just a small way for me to honor the true provider of the art I
create.

So.   See.   Nothing to it.

Who's ready to try one?

105 comments:

  1. Kathy! What a blessing you have given us. I've wondered about these directions every time you've posted a picture of your latest mosaic. I am so excited after reading about how-to-do-it. I definitely want to try; but I will work on something small first, maybe figure something out using a picture frame. That way I can practice and finish something in a relatively short time, so I will feel a sense of accomplishment (hopefully.) Otherwise, I'll know how truly unequipped I am to do this, and I wouldn't have wasted a lot of time and material $. I can't wait to try it! Thank you so much for sharing, Kathy.

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  2. Hi! So I've taken your advice, I'm doing it! One quick question, in your original picture of the tools, you have the silicone and there is another bottle, can you tell me what that is exactly? I'm a Mom of two, and a full time student, and work full time.. Long story short, I have a final project for art therapy, and I have decided to do this as my representation of my life in changing.. So any other tips would be great! Please and Ty!

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  3. Wow! I don't know how you juggle all that, but my hat's off to you! I'm excited you want to make a mosaic! You are absolutely right, I didn't identify the bottle in the photo with my other tools! opps! It's a bottle of cutter oil -- most (if not all) scorer tools (the hand held devise that scores the glass) requires oil to do it's job effectively. It's usually sold with the other tools. It will take me 10 years to use all the oil, but they only sell it in the size bottle you see! Here's just a few other tips as you begin your first mosaic:

    - I always wear glasses when you cut & break the glass.
    - Start with a very simple design; the simpler the better. When I started over five years ago, I did some clean, abstract lines or big simple graphics that required only a few colors.
    - If you've worked with glass before, you'll have an advantage, but if not, just be careful in handling it; my DNA is all over my early pieces because i nicked my fingers so many times!
    - use just the right amount of glue to secure your mosaic glass to your surface, but not so much that it oozes up on the sides of each piece; when that happens, the grout won't adhere and you won't get the result you want.

    If you didn't see my post on January 12, 2013 you can see a few other pieces I've done & may get some more ideas for a subject:

    http://uncomfortablelife.blogspot.com/2013/01/leaving-trail-of-windows-my-stained.html


    Have a great time! I would LOVE to see your finished piece! thanks so much for contacting me! I'm tickled you're trying it!

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    1. Oh great! Thanks for all your help! I will be sure to get you know how it comes out! Maybe a pic if I can figure out how to get it to you.. I live inRutland vt and I'm driving all the way over to White river jct.. Which is about an hour and 15 mins away to buy stained glass because there is no place around here.. :( road trip with my little lades! Ty again! I will be sure to show you how it comes out!

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    2. Hi there! I just wanted to let you know that I have finally completed my window! Yay! It came out beautiful and I couldn't be happier! It took some time because I decided to go for a large window.. 24"x19" :0) and I also became inspired by your beautiful dandilion window.. Anyway, I would love to upload a picture but I'm not sure how to exactly.. Any ideas? Thank you so much for all your advice.. I have giving a ton of people your blog and told them the process of doing it. It was a blast, and I ended up passing the class with flying colors! And now I graduate on Saturday! Thank you and I will make sure to keep in touch with my other projects!

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    3. Thank you for the instructions. I have been admiring this art form for a while and have been wanting to try it. Your instructions have given me confidence to try it.

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    4. I would love to see a picture of the dandelion window. Thanks.

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  5. Turning an old glass window into a stained glass mosaic window, I could only wish I'm as resourceful and creative as you, Kathy! The finished product is absolutely lovely! Have you hang it already? Show us a picture! =)

    Herb Koguchi

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  6. actually, Herb, this mosaic has already been given away - and is now hanging in a friend's home - but thank you -- glad you like the window!

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  7. So beautiful! I just hope i can afford that.
    morris plains

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  8. Who was the artist that painted the original art?

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    1. My oversight - the artist of the original art is Shelli Walters.

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  10. i am building a greenhouse and would like to know if this technique can be accomplished on a 2 foot square pane of glass BEFORE it has been mounted into a frame?

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  11. I've never done a mosaic on glass that was framed "after" the mosaic was completed, There's always a risk the mosaic can be damaged in the process. If you proceed, I'd suggest grouting it after the framing is done. Good luck.

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  12. Kathy
    Your work is magnificent! We are renovating our cabin and considering doing a mosaic stained glass as a transom over french doors. Our plan is to order a vinyl replacement window, fixed double pane argon filled glass window and attach our pieces of glass to the inside pane using your technique above. We have been practicing on some small pieces. Do you have any projects done on windows you plan to "install" into a house? How many years to you think these pieces might last? Any comments?

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    1. thank you! As a matter of fact, I'm working on a transom window right now that will be installed over an interior doorway! Double pane windows are my least favorite windows to work on - mostly because it's hard to see the design on the back of the glass -- because you're looking through two panes instead of one. I've never completed a mosaic of that size. wow! that's big! If a mosaic is displayed inside, it should have a long life expectancy. Harsh temperatures & the elements are a hazard to leaving them on porches or other outside locations. Good luck!

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  13. By the way, the project would be 72 inches wide and 18 inches high, but it is going in a great room. Are we crazy?

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  14. Thank you for these great instructions and photos. I would like to make a large piece using this process to display on and exterior wall. Anything special I need to consider to make it hold up to the elements?

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  15. Which aide of the glass do I glue diwn? The flat side or the rougher more interesting side?

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  16. Which aide of the glass do I glue diwn? The flat side or the rougher more interesting side?

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  17. I have a question... when applying tge stained glass to the windows, which side do you glue down? The flat side or the rough side of the glass? I am making a tree of life and the bark wous look more realistic if I kept the rough sides of the brown glass up... however the rest of the project will have smooth glass facing up. Kinda. Stuck at what to do. Thanks your projects as great.

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  18. I have a question... when applying tge stained glass to the windows, which side do you glue down? The flat side or the rough side of the glass? I am making a tree of life and the bark wous look more realistic if I kept the rough sides of the brown glass up... however the rest of the project will have smooth glass facing up. Kinda. Stuck at what to do. Thanks your projects as great.

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    Replies
    1. Lena -- you can glue either side to the window; I always pick the side based on the color - the texture doesn't matter; either glues well. Hope your project turns out great!

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  19. it looks beautiful. The glass mosaic tiles are very popular these years thanks to its beautifull decoration.
    welcome to visit us to get your writing material:
    Blogspot: hudsontiles.blogspot.com
    Website: www.HudsonChina.com
    www.HudsonCeramic.com

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  20. The blog was absolutely fantastic! Lot of great information which can be helpful in some or the other way.This is so creative as make stained glass mosaic windows with the help of some mosaic tools.. Keep updating the blog, looking forward for more contents...Great job, keep it up..

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  21. If you are still checking the comments/posts, I was wondering if you would tell me how you protect the edges of the wood-frame of the window, when filling in with grout.
    I love your work; it's been an inspiration for me to get started on something I've wanted to do for 3 years.
    thank you.

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    1. thank you! I don't do anything special to protect the wood frame when I grout; if you wipe the grout residue off the before it sets, it doesn't adhere to the frame. Just take some extra care to sponge or wipe it off with water during the grouting step. Glad you've found some inspiration to get started! Enjoy!

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    2. Hello. My granddaughter and I did a mosaic project and after it dried, the grout became ...not sure how to describe.. But powdery maybe? It wasn't smooth like when I used grout in the past. Do you have any idea what I did wrong? Not enough water? I ruined our project and don't know how to fix it. Just wondered if you would mind shedding some light. Thanks!! (Maybe my grout was old??). Now that I think of it not sure if it was sanded or I sanded grout. I'm sure glad to have your great directions. Thanks for the pix of the materials too. I appreciate you taking the guessing out of it. Love your window!! Thanks, Lisa

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  22. After grouting, is there any concern about the sharp edges of the glued down pieces of cut stained glass? It's seems as if not all the glass lies flat (I'll grout tomorrow).
    What a fun experience! Thank you for the inspiration.

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    Replies
    1. you're right -- the glass doesn't always lay flat against the window. I always caution people not to run their fingers across the surface -- it's always a little uneven & easy to cut your fingers; glad you enjoyed making a mosaic!

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  23. hi there! thank you so much for your excellent tutorial! intelligent and comprehensive....even i would be game for trying this now! i do not have illusions it will be great like yours. but hey, gotta start somewhere! what a gem you are! very few artists are willing to share their skills...very sad.

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  24. hi there! thank you so much for your excellent tutorial! intelligent and comprehensive....even i would be game for trying this now! i do not have illusions it will be great like yours. but hey, gotta start somewhere! what a gem you are! very few artists are willing to share their skills...very sad.

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  25. When flying glass to window, can the glue be let to seep out from under the glass? Will the grout adhere if there is glue between the pieces of glass?

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    1. I spread the glue evenly across the surface I'm covering with glass pieces. The grout will adhere to a small amount of glue on the glass, but if there's an excess of glue -- the grout won't adhere. You'll get the hang of it by trial and error. If your finished mosaic has a lot of excess glue between your glass pieces, you'll have to dig the glue out with a needle or blunt end of a paper clip. Hope that help!

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    2. Thank you so much for your answer. I hope to be able to make a window as nice as the one you posted here.

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  26. Thank you for sharing! What a beautiful piece of art. I'm going to give this a try. The colors you chose are just beautiful.

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  27. Will the silicone hold if the piece is displayed outside? I would like to mosaic an old window to hang on my shed.

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    1. I've displayed many of my windows outside; I usually suggest bringing the windows in during extreme temps just to be careful. The silicone shouldn't be exposed on the mosaic. The grout fills in the stained glass & covers the glue. Good luck!

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  28. What does the window look like from the wrong side? Does the glue look patchy?

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    1. Not really -- you can enjoy the window from both sides.

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  29. I have glass cut out for a partially done stained glass window I started years ago. I don't want to deal with solder or lead so I was thinking of glueing the pieces onto a window and using grout as you describe above. Some of my cut out pieces are fairly large. Do you know if I would I need to cut the glass into small pieces and make it into a mosaic?

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  30. I've not worked with large pieces of glass on my windows, so I'm really not sure. If you decide to cut them into smaller pieces of glass, I'd recommend the mosaic cracking tool instead of scoring it & breaking it. To me, the finished mosaic is more interesting when the glass pieces are random & varying sizes & cracked -- but that's just my preference. Good luck!

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  31. Wow! What an interesting way of using some scrap pieces of glass. Here in South Africa i've never seen people doing this. Thanks soo much for the interesting article and photos.

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  32. Wow! What an interesting way of using some scrap pieces of glass. Here in South Africa i've never seen people doing this. Thanks soo much for the interesting article and photos.

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  34. Kathy,
    I've noticed that after nipping the strips of glass with the mosaic-cutter, much of my smaller pieces are chipped. For the most part, I've ignored this. But is there something I'm doing wrong - like applying too much pressure when nipping? Or is this inherent of glass being cut by the mosaic-cutters?
    Thank you for the responses. I've gleaned quite a bit of useful information!
    Hope you had a Blessed and Merry Christmas.
    Frankie

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    1. Frankie, I rotate the round wheel on my mosaic cutter every so often to make sure I don't dull the edge. I've used mine quite a bit, so I've also had to replace the wheels (which come off the tool easily with an allen wrench.) The duller the cutter, the more chipping you'll see. Glad the blog has been helpful! Happy New Year!

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  35. regarding old windows: have you ever had to remove all the old putty & caulk before doing a glass mosaic? The old windows I bought are in need more repair than I realized. Can you point me in the direction of how to do this?
    thank you!

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  36. Yes! before you begin working on a window, you should always make sure the window/glass is sturdy! It's easy to do. Use a scraper or putty knife to remove any loose caulk on the back of the window. Because I work mostly with old windows, I often have to do some caulk repair before my mosaic gets underway. Just buy some clear window caulk at your hardware store. Apply a fresh line of caulk on the back of the window where the glass and the frame join. Let it dry thoroughly. It's a simple process. Good question!

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  37. Thanks for the detailed instructions..Just started my window. Have you ever had grout bleed under your stained glass?

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  38. a good coverage of silicone glue on your window will reduce the likelihood of grout bleeding under your stained glass pieces, but it can still happen. I smooth out the glue with my finger over the small area I'm working on & covering with glass. That minimizing the bleeding of grout. Hope that helps!

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  39. I finished one window and have now started on a second. Very time consuming but I love it. I do have another question though. I am now ready to seal the grout on my first window and need to know if you can just paint the grout and not have to worry about getting it on the glass or if I need to just paint the grout carefully and not get it on the glass. Your site has been very helpful and I love doing these projects. Thank you for all the great information you so readily share.

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    1. I've never sealed grout on my windows, Sherry, so I couldn't advise on that step. I use a sanded grout - and it holds up very well without an additional step of sealing. Glad you're enjoying the mosaics!

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  40. My good friend instead of porring so much gout, try applying it with a plastic spatula living only grout in the spaces. So cleaning is one step further.

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  41. Hello. I'm wondering about hanging such a heavy piece of art. Have you ever had to hang something really heavy, and, what do you use? Someone told me about a hanging clip or French clip, but that means the wall has to be permanently affected. Any scenarios you can describe having to do with heavy mosaics would be appreciated.

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  42. Hello. I use eye hooks or cup hooks and a light chain to hang my windows. They screw in easily to the window & are quite secure. Most of my windows are very heavy -- this method has always worked for me.

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  43. Is silicon glue suitable for a glass mosaic adhered to an outside wall?

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  44. I would think so, but check the information on the specific glue you're using to verify. I don't recommend directly exposing the glass mosaic windows to the weather.

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  46. I'm unclear about the silicone glue you used to attached your glass and wondering if you could clarify. Is the silicone pictured in the 10th picture from the top what you used to caulk around the window or is it the glue you used to attach the glass?

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  47. The silicone glue is used to attach the mosaic glass to the window. (It can also be used to caulk you window.)

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  48. I have a door with an opening about 20 x 28. It used to have stained glass in it. I want to put a mosaic in it. Would you frame the piece of glass in first and build it that way?

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  50. Cheri, only if you take the door off the hinges and lay it flat so that you can complete your mosaic/grout/and clean it first -- then re-install the door. If removing the door isn't an option, I would measure carefully and complete the mosaic on your glass surface/grout & clean it -- and then frame it in your door as a final step. Good luck!

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  51. Hi Kathy,
    I know you probably said what kind of glue you use to adhere the mosaic tiles to the window glass,but I can't find it in the blog.
    Please Help!

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  52. Robin, it's a clear 100% silicone glue - available at Wal-Mart or Lowes.

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  53. Thank you so much for getting back to me so quickly, Kathy!
    It will be awhile before I can get time to start a project, but I'm excited to get started! Thanks again!

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  54. Thank you so much for getting back to me so quickly, Kathy!
    It will be awhile before I can get time to start a project, but I'm excited to get started! Thanks again!

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  55. I have an old window with 3 panes I want to mosaic. When cleaning up the glass to prep the surface, one of the panes cracked. I am wondering if I should put a new piece of glass in the window frame. Have you ever had this happen and what is the best approach.

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    1. Hi Pam! yes, definitely replace the cracked glass; the last thing you'd want to do is invest the time in preparing the mosaic only to have it break later. Always invest some time in making sure your window & window panes are sound & well caulked. Good luck!

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  56. Thank you for sharing your wonderful tutorial! I am looking forward to trying this

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  57. I'm not sure how my question ended up on your Aug 2015 response. I should have proofed it too. I meant I wasn't sure if it was sanded or unsanded grout that I had the problem with. I just used some I'd had in the garage awhile. That's probably what the problem was. I read a few of your posts too. I'll be back to read more. :)

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    1. Lisa - hello! the age of your grout could have been the problem. I've used sanded and unsanded grout - but prefer the sanded grout on my mosaics! My oldest mosaic is about 7 years old -- and the grout is still holding up extremely well. Good luck on your glass!

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  58. Do you have a solution for the lead paint that may be on the Windows?

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  59. Do you have a solution for the lead paint that may be on the Windows?

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    1. Lead paint is found on most windows painted before the 1980's. I'd encourage you to do your own research about removing lead paint from a window. I can only share what's been my personal practice. I always scrape and clean my old windows outside, or in a well vented area. I've also used a face mask to provide protection from any dust or paint particles if a lot of scraping is required. Disposing of the lead paint chips & residue is also important. I'm not an expert in this area, so seek professional guidance if you'd like more information. Thanks!

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  60. After reading your blog post, I am very excited to do it at my home. I love your idea to make stained glass mosaic windows.
    patio doors

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  61. Great instructions!! I'm ready to get started!!

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  62. Your work is excellent! I do strained glass and fused glass work. I work mainly in a kiln for the fused glass as well as a hot pot which goes into the microwave but only one pendant at a time!!!!
    I will try this in the future (when I have time?). Regards

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  64. In your tutorial, you mentioned that you turned the window over and glued the glass on the front side. Before that, it looked like you already glued some glass on the window. Did you glue in on the back side, too?

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    1. Hello Susan. The glass is only glued on the front side of the glass. My design is drawn on the back side of the glass so that when I glue the glass on the front side of the window, I can follow the pattern I've created and can see from the other side.

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    2. (when I say the front side of the glass, I mean the front side of the window.) Hope that makes sense.

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  65. I do the same thing on glass-topped patio side tables. I put my pattern under the table when I am ready to glue it on & I just use white Lepages glue.

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  66. I do the same thing on glass-topped patio side tables. I put my pattern under the table when I am ready to glue it on & I just use white Lepages glue.

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  67. I've done several glass on glass mosaic pieces using E6000 glue. I've tried the clear silicone and find that it really doesn't try clear like the glue does. Several of my pieces have hung outside for several years. The only issue would be if using the E6000 in a closed area as it does have a strong order. So far I've done all my work outside.

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  68. Hi Kathy,
    Thanks for this, I've shared it on Patreon (where I am ElizabethLovesGlass)

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  69. So glad I found this. I have been wanting to learn how to do this and better yet I found you. I have been reading your blogs and I love the way you think. In many ways our lives are parallel. I don't follow anyone and I don't normally read these buy I enjoy reading your. Nice to meet you.

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  70. I have just completed my first mosaic glass on glass picture of a sun. My question: whyou not glue each piece and forget the grout? My masterpiece looks beautiful as it is. Have you ever done that?

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    1. congratulations on finishing your mosaic! no, I always grout my mosaics; they look completely different once the grout is added. i think it accentuates the color of the glass much more and defines each individual piece in your work! but -- it's your art. enjoy!

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  71. So beautiful and fun; maybe I'll be motivated to give it a try this summer with the old window that's been waiting 13 years!! Thank you for great instructions; I'm glad I finally looked it up to see that it is doable by me!

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  72. oh goody! I have had to give up making stained glass--leading is dangerous no matter what precautions one takes! I have somuch glass and NOW I have a way to play withteh medium I love! thank you!

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  73. Absolutely brilliant! And it looks SO pretty!!! thanks for sharing with us.

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  74. Your work is beautiful! I have been doing glass on glass mosaics for awhile on old windows. This time I got a small crack in the window glass. Not a huge problem, except that I was almost done with that pane. Do you think the grout will be enough to hold it together? I guess I am concerned that it will continue to crack. Help!

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    1. Hi! I've had that happen before as well at the end of a project. While the window is vulnerable with a crack, I do what I can to stop the crack from worsening by applying a thick application of clear silicone across the crack. The grout does add stability to the window, but also stress from the weight of the grout & stained glass. You only have two options 1) secure it as best you can or 2) toss the mosaic. Hope you have a good outcome! thank you!

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  75. Hi Kathy! I'm thrilled to have found your tutorial because just yesterday I went to a salvage place and bought some interesting old windows which this morning I have cleaned.. but the extra advice about caulking is valuable plus the sanded grout... thank you SO MUCH for being so charitable in sharing your work which is lovely!!! Cheers Barbara

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    1. thank you Barbara! hope you enjoy creating your own piece!

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  76. Best tutorial yet on this subject. What do you use to write the verse on the back?

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    1. thank you! I use a permanent sharpie to write a verse and/or sign the back of each window.

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  78. I have a window that is about 3.5 feet square. Can this be used without reinforcement?

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    1. Sophie - I've never used a window that large for mosaics. If you decide to use it, I would take extra steps to make sure the caulking & frame are strong & secure. The stained glass & grout add a great of extra weight to the windows.

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  79. Thank you! Exactly the information I needed and you presented it very clearly.
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